General

Why We Prefer Older Dogs

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Our 3 dogs – Mr Budro (Buddy), Rudi Roo (Rudi), and Miss Millie Mouse (Millie) are aged 11, 4 and 5 respectively.

Actually, we don’t really know how old Millie is… she was adopted via Maine Lab Rescue from a high kill shelter in Georgia and the various vets (4 of them – the one in Georgia, the one in Maine who spayed her, our original vet, and the new one we’ve started using) all thought she was probably between 4-5 years old when she came to us a year ago, which would make her 5-6 years old now.

So our dogs are all grown up, and we know what to expect from each of them.

Puppies are cute… wicked cute.  We both love the fat, fuzzy little critters, with their awkward gaits and sparkly eyes.  There’s nothing more fun than a pile of round little pups climbing all over you, sticking their puppy faces in yours.  And the smell of puppies… pure heaven.  I could smoosh my nose up against a puppy for hours, just breathing in that baby dog scent.

Love

But puppies rarely stop moving.  They’re into everything – non-stop – until they suddenly just plop down and fall asleep.  In the meantime, however, you’d better stay on your toes because you never know where you’ll find them.

And puppies pee and poop.  A lot.  Indiscriminately.  On anything that happens to be on the floor when they have to go.  It’s surprising how many things get left on the floor that one doesn’t even think about.  Shoes.  Books.  Grocery bags (sometimes with groceries still in them).  Tools.  Dirty laundry.  Clean laundry in baskets.  The list is surprisingly endless.

And puppies chew.  A lot.  Indiscriminately.  On anything that happens to be on or touching the floor.  At an average of $60 a pair, I lost literally a thousand dollars or more worth of shoes to Rudi when he was a pup.  My fault of course, but still…

Shoes, while apparently the preferred chew toy for puppies, aren’t the only things in one’s home that the little chew-monsters will target.   We have pillow cases that are now rags because one foster puppy ate holes in them.  Plants have been decimated.  Stuffed animals have given up their lives to puppies.  Two decades ago, my daughter’s border collie/black lab mix Buster practically ate through the legs of both a dining room chair AND the dining room table.  In one afternoon.

More recently, a foster pup chewed the floor (huh? how did he do that?) in the man cave, and the bottom of the newell post in our front hall.  We’ve heard horror stories of leather couches being decimated.  The upholstery in a friend’s truck was destroyed by her Westhighland White Terrier when she left him alone for a few minutes.

a.aaa-Sorry-I-am-late

To enable them to chew so very well, puppies have amazingly sharp little teeth.  Sharp like needles, they HURT!   When Rudi was a pup, he would jump up and sink his teeth into our hands, completely without warning sometimes.  Yes indeed, we were quite pleased when we were finally able to get him to quit pulling that stunt (or maybe he just outgrew it).

So puppies, despite their complete, totally lovable plumpness, are not our preference.

We love love love adult dogs.  And we love older dogs.  We love their eyes, so full of wisdom and gratitude.

We love their sense of dignity, their rituals and habits, their desire to snooze and cuddle for hours on end.

dog in hotel

We love them for their defined personalities, and who they’ve grown into as beings.   We love them… and are so grateful for the way they love us.

Adopt an adult dog, an older dog, a senior dog.  You’ll get back far more than you give.

For more reasons why adult dogs are the best, check out this blog:   10 Reasons Why You Should Adopt an Elderly Animal

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Adopt a Kitty! From the Greater Androscoggin Humane Society.

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From the Greater Androscoggin Humane Society.

GAHS - 12 12 13

Meet some of our new arrivals this Saturday. We will have new dogs, puppies, kittens and cats available for adoption!! Stop by and see them, and maybe take a new friend home for the Holidays!!

You can find them on Facebook at:  https://www.facebook.com/gahumane or check out their website at http://www.gahumane.org.

I’ve been involved with the Greater Androscoggin Humane Society in some fashion or another for decades, mostly by adopting our cats and dogs from them.  They’ve always been amazing, and clearly work very hard on behalf of the animals.  And their adoption numbers are huge!  People line up for hours in advance some days, just to be the first people in line to adopt.

Support… volunteer… donate!

Event: Maine Lab Rescue Adoption Event, Saturday, December 14

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Maine Lab Rescue - 12 14 13 Adoption Day

*** ADOPTION EVENT ***

PLEASE SHARE: Join them on Saturday, December 14th at Pet Quarters, 486 Payne Rd, Scarborough, ME for an adoption event.

They’ll be on site from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Meet the Maine Lab Rescue volunteers, learn more about fostering and meet their available pets!

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My husband and I have fostered through Maine Lab Rescue, and are what’s known as “foster failures”… we adopted one of the foster pups!  (She’s absolutely the best dog I’ve ever lived with!)

We can’t say enough good things about Maine Lab Rescue!

FMI: https://www.facebook.com/MaineLabRescue and http://www.mainelabrescue.org/

Maine Lab Rescue is not for labs only… and they rescue cats, too!

Franklin County (ME) Animal Shelter Challenge

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Franklin County Shelter

Help them get to 5,000 likes on Facebook… when they do, every Facebook fan get get $15 off any adoption in the shelter!

As of 5:00 am, Tuesday, December 10, 2103 they’re at 4,771 likes… not all that many left to go!

From their website:

The purpose of Franklin County Animal Shelter is to provide temporary care and shelter to stray, homeless and abandoned companion animals.

Medical treatment including vaccinations and sterilization is provide to all animals prior to adoption.

FCAS serves the community as an adoption facility where loving families and pets needing homes come together.

The Shelter strives to educate the public in the proper care of pets including increasing public awareness of the companion animal overpopulation issue.


Paw_sDid you know that the adoption fee only covers 25% of what each animal costs the shelter?  

Maine Animal Welfare Advisory Council Meeting

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I don’t know anything about these meetings… do any of you?  This is just a copy and paste from the maine.gov website.

http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/index.php?topic=Portal_Public_Calendar&id=592048&v=Article-2006

Public Meeting Calendar

Animal Welfare Advisory Council

Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry

Back to full Meeting Calendar

Date: September 26, 2013

Start Time: 9:00 AM

Location: Deering Building 90 Blossom Lane Room 233 Augusta

Meeting description/purpose:

Related documents (if any):
Note: Some documents are provided in Microsoft Word format (MS Word). Download the free Word Viewer if you do not have Microsoft Word on your computer. Rich Text Format (RTF) documents may be viewed in any word processing software.

For further information, contact:

Name: Liam Hughes

Phone: 207-287-3846

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If you love animals the way we love animals, we hope you’ll get involved with The Maine Pet Expos.

Next year (2014), we will produce three pet shows, the Greater Portland Pet Expo on June 5-6 at Seasons Conference Center (off Exit 48); the Greater Bangor Pet Expo on September 12-13 at the Cross Insurance Conference Center in Bangor, and the Greater Androscoggin Pet Expo on September 26-27 at the Lewiston Armory on Central Avenue.

FMI:  Please join our discussion group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MainePetExpos, and “like” our page:  https://www.facebook.com/themainepetexpos.

For exhibit booth, sponsorship, show program advertising, workshops, Designated Non-Profit, and volunteer information, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.  As we get a bit closer, you’ll be able to find exhibitors, sponsors, advertisers and attendee information on eventbrite.com

We’re also slowly working on developing a non-profit to raise funds for animal rescues – AARF – Animal Activist and Resource Fund.  You can read more about AARF at https://www.facebook.com/AARF.AnimalActivistResourceFund.

We foster dogs through two rescue organizations (Maine Lab Rescue and The Pixel Fund), and collect donations for several rescues, including Tommy’s Feral Feline Friends.  For more information on any of our efforts, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.

And if you’d like to read random thoughts about our dogs, please follow us at http://themainedogblog.wordpress.com.

Welcome to our world!

Would You Pay Extra to Reduce Your Pet’s Pain During Surgery?

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GOOD NEWS – Pet owners – would you pay $100 to vastly reduce pain during a pet’s surgery? Read on. 09.16.13.  reprint. see link below.

Demand for laser outfitted Veterinarian operating rooms used to be about the same as demand for animal organ transplants. But like most technology, the price has come down, and it’s beginning to infiltrate the pet world.

Lasik surgery on the eyes has certainly earned a reputation for fast, incredibly accurate, and well understood technology that people now routinely choose as option to correct vision.  It’s also found its way into other procedures for humans. Now it’s available for pet surgery.

For spaying female pets, it’s all about the difference between cutting with a scalpel and cutting with a laser.  Both work fine to get the job done, but laser cutting does a number of things that scalpels do not.

Burning rather than cutting kills bacteria.  Bacteria live on skin by the trillions. They also hang out in in tissue, blood vessels, and the lymphatic system, even after you scrub the surfaces. When you cut with a sterile scalpel, you just move the bacteria aside.  But when you burn the incisions, you kill the ones on the edge. This reduces the exposure to infection.

Burning seals off vessels that cutting leaves gaping open. When you cut through any tissue, you are severing hundreds of vessels that carry blood and liquid through the body.  When you sew up afterwards, all those little vessels remaining open, which ooze.  Oozing establishes little rivers of water for bacteria to swim up into a wound.  Lasers seal all those vessels so they don’t ooze.

Burning also shuts down pain sensors.  We feel pain not because it hurts there, but because a pain sensor has sent a message back to the brain to tell it to feel pain there.  Cutting with a scalpel leaves sensors intact so they can send pain messages to the brain, which they do at their loudest after trauma like a knife cut. Burning shuts them down so they’re literally quiet. Thus, less pain is “felt.”

The results?  For $75 to $100 more money, your pet will recover faster, suffer less pain, have less stiches (with no outside stiches that have to be removed) and face less risk of infection.

P.S.: I just had my puppy Kaya spayed, pictured above.  She recovered remarkably fast. I totally recommend it. We went to PenBay Veterinary Associates in Rockland, Maine, Dr. Bjorn Lee performing. (website here)

Photo credit: Jam Blackall

Gren Blackall

http://www.mainenewssimply.com/content/good-news-bad-news/good-news-pet-owners-would-you-pay-100-vastly-reduce-pain-during-pet-s-su

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If you love animals the way we love animals, we hope you’ll get involved with The Maine Pet Expos.

Next year (2014), we will produce three pet shows, the Greater Portland Pet Expo on June 5-6 at Seasons Conference Center (off Exit 48); the Greater Bangor Pet Expo on September 12-13 at the Cross Insurance Conference Center in Bangor, and the Greater Androscoggin Pet Expo on September 26-27 at the Lewiston Armory on Central Avenue.

FMI:  Please join our discussion group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MainePetExpos, and “like” our page:  https://www.facebook.com/themainepetexpos.

For exhibit booth, sponsorship, show program advertising, workshops, Designated Non-Profit, and volunteer information, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.  As we get a bit closer, you’ll be able to find exhibitors, sponsors, advertisers and attendee information on eventbrite.com

We’re also slowly working on developing a non-profit to raise funds for animal rescues – AARF – Animal Activist and Resource Fund.  You can read more about AARF at https://www.facebook.com/AARF.AnimalActivistResourceFund.

We foster dogs through two rescue organizations (Maine Lab Rescue and The Pixel Fund), and collect donations for several rescues, including Tommy’s Feral Feline Friends.  For more information on any of our efforts, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.

And if you’d like to read random thoughts about our dogs, please follow us at http://themainedogblog.wordpress.com.

Welcome to our world!

It Ain’t Easy Being in Business…

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Just had to turn down a potential vendor/exhibitor for three separate reasons. I feel badly about it because she seemed very nice and earnest, but being in business nowadays isn’t as easy as cooking some dog treats and selling them. The whole world is lawsuit happy, and there are state laws we must all follow.

The issues were that she….
a) wanted to exhibit and sell her dog treats without a Certificate of Insurance (NO! if someone’s dog gets sick, we all get sued),
b) wanted to exhibit and sell her dog treats without a State Resale Tax ID (NO! that’s illegal), and
c) wanted to run a raffle to give away her dog treats if I wouldn’t allow her to sell without the COI and Resale ID # (NO! state law says you must be a registered non-profit to run a raffle…..).

Here’s my response…

Yes, you would need a State Resale Tax ID number to sell products at the show… that’s state law.

The Certificate of Insurance is also needed…. heaven forbid someone claimed their dog got sick from eating your treats. Not only would they sue you, but they’d sue me too if you didn’t have insurance. I’ve been in business for many years, and people are sue-happy. You just don’t want to take a chance. Besides, both the Lewiston Armory and the Cross Insurance Center in Bangor require it of the vendors (not just from me). So there’s no way around it.

(For exhibitors who are not selling food products or not bringing animals with them, I will allow a “waiver of insurance”.)

The Certificate of Insurance is needed even for the mixes. Someone could still claim that something in the mix made their dog sick. You really should consider having insurance. Why take the chance of losing your house because someone decided to be a jerk?

And I hate to offer more bad news, but as a for-profit, private individual, you aren’t allowed to run raffles. There are state laws regarding those as well, which are governed by the state police. It’s rare that anyone gets in trouble with it, but there have been instances and it wasn’t a fun situation for the people involved. Here’s a link to a Bangor Daily News article re this issue.
http://bangordailynews.com/2010/03/19/news/bangor/police-thwart-raffle-aimed-at-helping-nonprofit/

And here’s the first paragraph from the state’s fact sheet on raffles [which I attached to my email]:

Raffles:

Who may conduct a Raffle?

Only a bonafide non-profit organization that meets the licensing requirements for a Game of Chance may conduct a Raffle (Licensed or Unlicensed). An individual or business (that does not meet the licensing criteria) may not conduct a raffle in which a person provides something of value for a chance to enter the raffle.
I’m really sorry to be such a downer about this all. Obviously I want as many exhibitors as possible, since that’s how I make my living. But I don’t want to place either myself, you or anyone else in a position of inadvertently breaking the law or otherwise getting into trouble.

Thanks so much for your interest… if there’s any way you can work through these issues, I’d love to talk with you further.

Linda