Ten Ways to Help Your Local Shelter or Rescue

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Reprint from HSUS. Click on the link below for more info.
http://www.humanesociety.org/animal_community/resources/tips/help_shelters_rescues.html?utm_source=potw110313&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=fall13&goback=%2Egde_55100_member_5806053724518379521#%21

Give a hand to the groups that do so much for animals, people, and your community
Shelters and rescues are amazing! They help untold numbers of animals and people, usually with limited resources and very little publicity. Do you want to give back to the these unsung heroes and organizations who contribute so much to your community? Try one—or all—of the following ten ways to help shelters and rescue groups. Don’t be surprised if you end up feeling good and having fun.

1. Share your love
Tell the world how you feel about your local shelter or rescue by using The Humane Society of the United States’ Facebook share graphics.

This Person Supports - Dog

This Person Supports - Cat

Just click on your favorite to add the image to your Facebook page. (If you think they’re both too cute to choose a favorite, swap them out every day.)

2. Get to know your local shelters and rescue groups
Start the process by locating all of the ones in your area. You may be surprised how many groups nearby are helping animals.

3. Learn before you leap
Before you adopt, go to the Shelter Pet Project to learn what to expect when adopting a pet. You’ll be much less likely to become frustrated and return your new pet if you understand the challenges and rewards of adopting a pet beforehand.

4. Say “thanks!”
Take a minute to express your gratitude to the people who work at your local shelter or rescue groups. If you’ve adopted a pet from one of them, show how well your pet is doing by sharing an updated picture via a letter, email, or posting it on the organization’s Facebook page or website.

5. Get crafty
Combine fabric, yarn, recyclables, and imagination to bring much-needed fun into the lives of local shelter and rescue pets. There’s no end to the toys you can make. Try braiding strips of fleece into fun for dogs, or cutting and folding a surprising household object into a cat distractor.

Are you a born match-maker? Create attention-grabbing “Adopt-Me” vests to spotlight available pets at adoption events held by shelters and rescues. We’ve found DIY options for those of us who avoid sewing as well as sewing-machine wizards.

6. Become a fan
“Like” the Shelter Pet Project on Facebook. Then, if possible, “like” the individual groups in your community, too.

7. Make wishes come true
Shelters and rescue groups always need towels, toys, and other supplies. Check their websites for wish lists or call them to find out what’s in short supply.

8. Volunteer
Even if you can’t adopt a pet just now, you can help make life better for homeless animals by volunteering with your local shelter or rescue organization. Do you have experience as a carpenter or electrician? Are you a marketing or dog-walking whiz? All of these skills are valuable!

9. Help at your own home
Make the jobs of shelters and rescues easier: Outfit your cats and dogs with collars and proper ID (a microchip and ID tags) at all times. As soon as you bring them into your family, have all of your pets spayed or neutered. Keep your cats indoors, where you can keep them safe (though it’s great to take them on walks if they are comfortable on a harness and leash), and keep dogs on leashes when off your property.

10. Help your shelter make positive changes
If you see or hear anything at your local shelter that concerns you, follow The HSUS’s guidelines for addressing that concern in the most effective way.

AKC’s Canine Good Citizen

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The post below is copied directly from the AKC site… it gives a great test of “Good Citizenship”. This is good stuff.

http://www.akc.org/events/cgc/training_testing.cfm

AKC

AKC’S CANINE GOOD CITIZEN®

Training/Testing: CGC Test Items

Before taking the Canine Good Citizen test, owners will sign the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge. We believe that responsible dog ownership is a key part of the CGC concept and by signing the pledge, owners agree to take care of their dog’s health needs, safety, exercise, training and quality of life. Owners also agree to show responsibility by doing things such as cleaning up after their dogs in public places and never letting dogs infringe on the rights of others.

After signing the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge, owners and their dogs are ready to take the CGC Test. Items on the Canine Good Citizen Test include:

Test 1: Accepting a friendly stranger

This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to approach it and speak to the handler in a natural, everyday situation. The evaluator walks up to the dog and handler and greets the handler in a friendly manner, ignoring the dog. The evaluator and handler shake hands and exchange pleasantries. The dog must show no sign of resentment or shyness.

Test 2: Sitting politely for petting

This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to touch it while it is out with its handler. With the dog sitting at the handler’s side, to begin the exercise, the evaluator pets the dog on the head and body. The handler may talk to his or her dog throughout the exercise. The dog may stand in place as it is petted. The dog must not show shyness or resentment.

Test 3: Appearance and grooming

This practical test demonstrates that the dog will welcome being groomed and examined and will permit someone, such as a veterinarian, groomer or friend of the owner, to do so. It also demonstrates the owner’s care, concern and sense of responsibility. The evaluator inspects the dog to determine if it is clean and groomed. The dog must appear to be in healthy condition (i.e., proper weight, clean, healthy and alert). The handler should supply the comb or brush commonly used on the dog. The evaluator then softly combs or brushes the dog, and in a natural manner, lightly examines the ears and gently picks up each front foot. It is not necessary for the dog to hold a specific position during the examination, and the handler may talk to the dog, praise it and give encouragement throughout.

Test 4: Out for a walk (walking on a loose lead)

This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog may be on either side of the handler. The dog’s position should leave no doubt that the dog is attentive to the handler and is responding to the handler’s movements and changes of direction. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops. The evaluator may use a pre-plotted course or may direct the handler/dog team by issuing instructions or commands. In either case, there should be a right turn, left turn, and an about turn with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The handler may talk to the dog along the way, praise the dog, or give commands in a normal tone of voice. The handler may sit the dog at the halts if desired.

Test 5: Walking through a crowd

This test demonstrates that the dog can move about politely in pedestrian traffic and is under control in public places. The dog and handler walk around and pass close to several people (at least three). The dog may show some interest in the strangers but should continue to walk with the handler, without evidence of over-exuberance, shyness or resentment. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise the dog throughout the test. The dog should not jump on people in the crowd or strain on the leash.

Test 6: Sit and down on command and Staying in place

This test demonstrates that the dog has training, will respond to the handler’s commands to sit and down and will remain in the place commanded by the handler (sit or down position, whichever the handler prefers). The dog must do sit AND down on command, then the owner chooses the position for leaving the dog in the stay. Prior to this test, the dog’s leash is replaced with a line 20 feet long. The handler may take a reasonable amount of time and use more than one command to get the dog to sit and then down. The evaluator must determine if the dog has responded to the handler’s commands. The handler may not force the dog into position but may touch the dog to offer gentle guidance. When instructed by the evaluator, the handler tells the dog to stay and walks forward the length of the line, turns and returns to the dog at a natural pace. The dog must remain in the place in which it was left (it may change position) until the evaluator instructs the handler to release the dog. The dog may be released from the front or the side.

Test 7: Coming when called

This test demonstrates that the dog will come when called by the handler. The handler will walk 10 feet from the dog, turn to face the dog, and call the dog. The handler may use encouragement to get the dog to come. Handlers may choose to tell dogs to “stay” or “wait” or they may simply walk away, giving no instructions to the dog.

Test 8: Reaction to another dog

This test demonstrates that the dog can behave politely around other dogs. Two handlers and their dogs approach each other from a distance of about 20 feet, stop, shake hands and exchange pleasantries, and continue on for about 10 feet. The dogs should show no more than casual interest in each other. Neither dog should go to the other dog or its handler.

Test 9: Reaction to distraction

This test demonstrates that the dog is confident at all times when faced with common distracting situations. The evaluator will select and present two distractions. Examples of distractions include dropping a chair, rolling a crate dolly past the dog, having a jogger run in front of the dog, or dropping a crutch or cane. The dog may express natural interest and curiosity and/or may appear slightly startled but should not panic, try to run away, show aggressiveness, or bark. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise it throughout the exercise.

Test 10: Supervised separation

This test demonstrates that a dog can be left with a trusted person, if necessary, and will maintain training and good manners. Evaluators are encouraged to say something like, “Would you like me to watch your dog?” and then take hold of the dog’s leash. The owner will go out of sight for three minutes. The dog does not have to stay in position but should not continually bark, whine, or pace unnecessarily, or show anything stronger than mild agitation or nervousness. Evaluators may talk to the dog but should not engage in excessive talking, petting, or management attempts (e.g, “there, there, it’s alright”).

Equipment

All tests must be performed on leash. For collars, dogs should wear well-fitting buckle or slip collars made of leather, fabric, or chain. Special training collars such as pinch collars, head halters, and electronic collars are not permitted in the CGC test.

As of November 4, 2010, body harnesses may be used in the CGC test. The evaluator should check to make sure the harness is not of a type that completely restricts the dog’s movement such that it could not pull or jump up if it tried.

We recognize that special training collars such as head collars and no-jump harnesses may be very useful tools for beginning dog trainers, however, we feel that dogs are ready to take the CGC test at the point at which they are transitioned to equipment that allows the evaluator to see that the dog has been trained.

The evaluator supplies a 20-foot lead for the test. The owner/handler should bring the dog’s brush or comb to the test.

Encouragement

Owners/handlers may use praise and encouragement throughout the test. The owner may pet the dog between exercises. Food and treats are not permitted during testing, nor is the use of toys, squeaky toys, etc. to get the dog to do something. We recognize that food and toys may provide valuable reinforcement or encouragement during the training process but these items should not be used during the test.

Failures – Dismissals

Any dog that eliminates during testing must be marked failed. The only exception to this rule is that elimination is allowable in test Item 10, but only when test Item 10 is held outdoors.

Any dog that growls, snaps, bites, attacks, or attempts to attack a person or another dog is not a good citizen and must be dismissed from the test.

Courtesy Post: Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting

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Kick Off Meetings - Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting
Kick Off Meetings – Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting

We are not involved with this group, other than to support their mission. The text below is taken directly from the Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting Meetup page.

Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting is seeking to enact long-overdue protections for Maine’s bear population. Bears are majestic and beloved creatures, in Maine. Yet it is the only state to allow statewide hounding, baiting, and trapping, cruel, unsporting, and unnecessary practices that do not reflect Maine values or hunting tradition. It’s time for fair bear hunting. This fall, we will begin gathering 80,000 signatures to put this important issue on the 2014 ballot.

For more information visit our website, http://www.fairbearhunt.com/events or give the office a call.

We hope to see you at one of our fourteen kick off meetings across Maine! Even if you cannot attend, we’d love for you to get involved! Visit http://www.fairbearhunt.com to learn more about the campaign and to sign up to volunteer.

Maine Animal Welfare Advisory Council Meeting

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I don’t know anything about these meetings… do any of you?  This is just a copy and paste from the maine.gov website.

http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/index.php?topic=Portal_Public_Calendar&id=592048&v=Article-2006

Public Meeting Calendar

Animal Welfare Advisory Council

Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry

Back to full Meeting Calendar

Date: September 26, 2013

Start Time: 9:00 AM

Location: Deering Building 90 Blossom Lane Room 233 Augusta

Meeting description/purpose:

Related documents (if any):
Note: Some documents are provided in Microsoft Word format (MS Word). Download the free Word Viewer if you do not have Microsoft Word on your computer. Rich Text Format (RTF) documents may be viewed in any word processing software.

For further information, contact:

Name: Liam Hughes

Phone: 207-287-3846

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If you love animals the way we love animals, we hope you’ll get involved with The Maine Pet Expos.

Next year (2014), we will produce three pet shows, the Greater Portland Pet Expo on June 5-6 at Seasons Conference Center (off Exit 48); the Greater Bangor Pet Expo on September 12-13 at the Cross Insurance Conference Center in Bangor, and the Greater Androscoggin Pet Expo on September 26-27 at the Lewiston Armory on Central Avenue.

FMI:  Please join our discussion group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MainePetExpos, and “like” our page:  https://www.facebook.com/themainepetexpos.

For exhibit booth, sponsorship, show program advertising, workshops, Designated Non-Profit, and volunteer information, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.  As we get a bit closer, you’ll be able to find exhibitors, sponsors, advertisers and attendee information on eventbrite.com

We’re also slowly working on developing a non-profit to raise funds for animal rescues – AARF – Animal Activist and Resource Fund.  You can read more about AARF at https://www.facebook.com/AARF.AnimalActivistResourceFund.

We foster dogs through two rescue organizations (Maine Lab Rescue and The Pixel Fund), and collect donations for several rescues, including Tommy’s Feral Feline Friends.  For more information on any of our efforts, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.

And if you’d like to read random thoughts about our dogs, please follow us at http://themainedogblog.wordpress.com.

Welcome to our world!

Would You Pay Extra to Reduce Your Pet’s Pain During Surgery?

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GOOD NEWS – Pet owners – would you pay $100 to vastly reduce pain during a pet’s surgery? Read on. 09.16.13.  reprint. see link below.

Demand for laser outfitted Veterinarian operating rooms used to be about the same as demand for animal organ transplants. But like most technology, the price has come down, and it’s beginning to infiltrate the pet world.

Lasik surgery on the eyes has certainly earned a reputation for fast, incredibly accurate, and well understood technology that people now routinely choose as option to correct vision.  It’s also found its way into other procedures for humans. Now it’s available for pet surgery.

For spaying female pets, it’s all about the difference between cutting with a scalpel and cutting with a laser.  Both work fine to get the job done, but laser cutting does a number of things that scalpels do not.

Burning rather than cutting kills bacteria.  Bacteria live on skin by the trillions. They also hang out in in tissue, blood vessels, and the lymphatic system, even after you scrub the surfaces. When you cut with a sterile scalpel, you just move the bacteria aside.  But when you burn the incisions, you kill the ones on the edge. This reduces the exposure to infection.

Burning seals off vessels that cutting leaves gaping open. When you cut through any tissue, you are severing hundreds of vessels that carry blood and liquid through the body.  When you sew up afterwards, all those little vessels remaining open, which ooze.  Oozing establishes little rivers of water for bacteria to swim up into a wound.  Lasers seal all those vessels so they don’t ooze.

Burning also shuts down pain sensors.  We feel pain not because it hurts there, but because a pain sensor has sent a message back to the brain to tell it to feel pain there.  Cutting with a scalpel leaves sensors intact so they can send pain messages to the brain, which they do at their loudest after trauma like a knife cut. Burning shuts them down so they’re literally quiet. Thus, less pain is “felt.”

The results?  For $75 to $100 more money, your pet will recover faster, suffer less pain, have less stiches (with no outside stiches that have to be removed) and face less risk of infection.

P.S.: I just had my puppy Kaya spayed, pictured above.  She recovered remarkably fast. I totally recommend it. We went to PenBay Veterinary Associates in Rockland, Maine, Dr. Bjorn Lee performing. (website here)

Photo credit: Jam Blackall

Gren Blackall

http://www.mainenewssimply.com/content/good-news-bad-news/good-news-pet-owners-would-you-pay-100-vastly-reduce-pain-during-pet-s-su

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If you love animals the way we love animals, we hope you’ll get involved with The Maine Pet Expos.

Next year (2014), we will produce three pet shows, the Greater Portland Pet Expo on June 5-6 at Seasons Conference Center (off Exit 48); the Greater Bangor Pet Expo on September 12-13 at the Cross Insurance Conference Center in Bangor, and the Greater Androscoggin Pet Expo on September 26-27 at the Lewiston Armory on Central Avenue.

FMI:  Please join our discussion group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MainePetExpos, and “like” our page:  https://www.facebook.com/themainepetexpos.

For exhibit booth, sponsorship, show program advertising, workshops, Designated Non-Profit, and volunteer information, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.  As we get a bit closer, you’ll be able to find exhibitors, sponsors, advertisers and attendee information on eventbrite.com

We’re also slowly working on developing a non-profit to raise funds for animal rescues – AARF – Animal Activist and Resource Fund.  You can read more about AARF at https://www.facebook.com/AARF.AnimalActivistResourceFund.

We foster dogs through two rescue organizations (Maine Lab Rescue and The Pixel Fund), and collect donations for several rescues, including Tommy’s Feral Feline Friends.  For more information on any of our efforts, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.

And if you’d like to read random thoughts about our dogs, please follow us at http://themainedogblog.wordpress.com.

Welcome to our world!

Rabies Challenge Fund

Posted on Updated on

.Tikken

Courtesy Post for Green Acres Kennel.

Please join our fundraiser for the Rabies Challenge Fund! – This is our memorial for our Golden Retriever Tikken who had a serious reaction to a Rabies vaccination when she was four. We will match every dollar we raise from friends, clients, colleagues, and relatives up to $1500. The Rabies Challenge Fund is working to make Rabies vaccinations safe and laws more intelligent. For more information: http://bit.ly/170Gg2g.

PLEASE SHARE!

—————————–

If you love animals the way we love animals, we hope you’ll get involved with The Maine Pet Expos.

Next year (2014), we will produce three pet shows, the Greater Portland Pet Expo on June 5-6 at Seasons Conference Center (off Exit 48); the Greater Bangor Pet Expo on September 12-13 at the Cross Insurance Conference Center in Bangor, and the Greater Androscoggin Pet Expo on September 26-27 at the Lewiston Armory on Central Avenue.

FMI:  Please join our discussion group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/MainePetExpos, and “like” our page:  https://www.facebook.com/themainepetexpos.

For exhibit booth, sponsorship, show program advertising, workshops, Designated Non-Profit, and volunteer information, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.  As we get a bit closer, you’ll be able to find exhibitors, sponsors, advertisers and attendee information on eventbrite.com

We’re also slowly working on developing a non-profit to raise funds for animal rescues – AARF – Animal Activist and Resource Fund.  You can read more about AARF at https://www.facebook.com/AARF.AnimalActivistResourceFund.

We foster dogs through two rescue organizations (Maine Lab Rescue and The Pixel Fund), and collect donations for several rescues.  For more information on either of these efforts, please contact Linda at LSnyder (at) regroupbiz (dot) com.

And if you like to read random thoughts about our dogs, please follow us at http://themainedogblog.wordpress.com.

Welcome to our world